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  • Article / 24 July 2015 at 5:03 GMT

    3 Numbers: European PMIs edge higher, US PMI and new home sales

    Blogger / MoreLiver's Daily
    Finland
    3 Numbers: European PMIs edge higher, US PMI and new home sales
    The trading week ends with a whiff of the future in the shape of July's flash purchasing manager indices – no big surprises are expected, and the moderate recovery will probably be the main issue. In the US, a post-crisis high in new home sales will help set the stage for the next week's meeting of the Federal Reserve, which may begin to signal a rate hike in September.
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    Cassy Cassy
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  • Editor’s Picks / 24 July 2015 at 4:06 GMT

    China on 7% growth without monetary policy sugar hit

    Business Spectator
    Here’s the key takeaway from China’s latest GDP numbers: 7% growth looks sustainable. China expanded at this rate in the second quarter, just as it did in the first. But the real story was how this growth was achieved: China has made the leap to being driven by services. Put another way, the traditional powerhouse sectors of manufacturing and construction can be sluggish and the growth target of 7% can still be met. That China’s economy is now services-driven bodes well for the sustainability of growth. Another key message from the figures is that China’s economy can grow at 7% without a big monetary policy sugar hit.
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    Cassy Cassy
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  • Editor’s Picks / 24 July 2015 at 3:26 GMT

    China factories falter, commodities take the hit

    Reuters
    Activity in China's factory sector seemingly contracted at the fastest pace in 15 months in July, a preliminary private survey showed on Friday in a blow undercutting recent signs of stabilisation in the struggling economy. The news came as Beijing announced it would allow its yuan currency to fluctuate more widely within its trading band. Fears of faltering demand in the world's largest commodity buyer piled further pressure on resource prices, sending gold to a five-year low and copper to a six-year trough. It also added to the woes of emerging market nations. The flash Caixin/Markit China Purchasing Managers' Index (PMI) dropped to 48.2, the lowest reading since April last year and the fifth straight month under 50 which separates contraction from expansion. According to government data, industrial output is still rising. The drop confounded forecasts for a rise to 49.7, from June's final reading of 49.4, and slugged the Australian dollar to a six-year low.
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  • Editor’s Picks / 24 July 2015 at 3:12 GMT

    The meaning of China’s stockmarket intervention

    Bloomberg
    The spectacle of the stock market meltdown in China has led many analysts and investors to see an upside to the downturn. The slump is “the most serious crisis” facing President Xi Jinping “since he came to power,” China commentator Willy Lam said on July 10. “It will require a lot to restore people’s confidence in the regime.” Volatility might force the state to clean up the unregulated loans fueling stock purchases and to intervene less in equity markets and the broader economy. The drop might even foster massive discontent with the Communist Party and support for real political reform. In reality, the stock market plunge is likely to have the opposite effect. Xi’s government is too closely linked, in many citizens’ minds, to a guarantee that stocks are a safe and profitable bet. “When a market malfunctions, the government should not let market sentiment turn from bad to worse.” said a July 20 commentary in the People’s Daily.
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    Cassy Cassy
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  • Editor’s Picks / 24 July 2015 at 2:39 GMT

    Oil rout could rival iconic crude crash of 1986

    The Sydney Morning Herald
    Morgan Stanley has been pessimistic about oil prices in 2015, drawing comparisons to the worst oil slumps of the past 30 years. The downturn could even rival the iconic crash of 1986, analysts warn. While for now, it is sticking with its original thesis that prices will improve, Morgan Stanley has revised its worst-case scenario. Until recently, confidence in a strong recovery for oil had been pretty high. That confidence was based on four premises, including the belief that reduced money for exploration should trim the global glut. But the opposite has happened: while US production has levelled off, Opec has become the market spoiler.
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  • Article / 24 July 2015 at 1:53 GMT

    China’s buyouts - home is now where the money is

    China Watcher / Shanghai
    China
    In May and June, a wave of US-listed Chinese firms announced privatisation deals. But doubts rose over these deals as domestic indices fell over 30% within weeks as the government cracked down on margin trading. Questions over these buyout bids remain unanswered.
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