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  • 08 April
    Anatoly Vyacheslav Anatoly Vyacheslav
    This comment has been redacted
    24 April
    Jadira F. Norton Jadira F. Norton
    Trade tariffs has crimped equities trades on the ASX::
    24 April
    Jadira F. Norton Jadira F. Norton
    Saxo Capital Markets this is an amazing Trading::
  • Article / 23 March 2018 at 11:30 GMT

    Just because China can doesn’t mean it will

    Managing Director / Asia-analytica Research
    China
    Just because China can doesn’t mean it will
    Before we all hyperventilate at the thought of a trade war between the world’s two biggest economies, let’s look at the forces that might pull the world back from the brink: the globalisation of supply chains, pushback from other trade players, and China’s pragmatic response.
    Read the article
    23 March
    Alan M Alan M
    Hypothetically speaking, if the US and china were to fight it out, can the US under trump actually win? Trump cant even seem to get his cabinet...
    04 April
    Pauline Loong Pauline Loong
    Watch out for smoke and mirrors. There is less to Beijing's newly announced US$50 billion tit-for-tat tariffs package than meets the eye. To give three examples from...
  • Article / 22 February 2017 at 15:00 GMT

    China-US trade war — the bark is not the bite

    Managing Director / Asia-analytica Research
    China
    China-US trade war — the bark is not the bite
    China has so far refused to be baited into the first steps down a mutually destructive spiral of a trade war, as events since Trump’s inauguration have shown. But it shouldn't be assumed that the new US president actually wants to start a trade war – there are easier ways of being seen as living up to his China campaign promise. Do not mistake the bark for the bite.
    Read the article
  • Article / 13 December 2016 at 14:00 GMT

    Trigger-happy Trump stalks baffled China

    Former managing editor, TradingFloor.com / Saxo Bank
    Denmark
    Trigger-happy Trump stalks baffled China
    One of the more bizarre themes emerging since Donald Trump's election last month is his continued baiting of China, which was ratcheted up a significant notch this past week when he questioned the One-China policy. Is this geopolitical shift for real and what will it mean for markets?
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    1y
    Martin O'Rourke Martin O'Rourke
    And on it goes after this weekend's drone affair draws yet more barbs from Trump's rapier like pen (aka Twitter feed) https://www.tradingfloor.com/posts/morning-markets-trump-spells-it-out-to-china-8330704
    1y
    mandyspak mandyspak
    This comment has been redacted
    21 May
    jjlewis jjlewis
    We have a direct genuine provider for BG/SBLC specifically for lease, at leasing price of 4+2 of face value, Issuance by HSBC London/Hong Kong or any other...
  • 1y
    vanita vanita
    Orange juice rockss........Steve
    1y
    vanita vanita
    Great call👍
    1y
    Stephen Pope Stephen Pope
    Very juice Miss V!!!
  • Editor’s Picks / 26 July 2016 at 0:56 GMT

    Rise of US, Chinese protectionism poses hurdles for Korean exporters

    The Korea Herald
    Amid the rising tide of protectionism, a growing number of Korean companies are becoming the targets of protectionist measures in major overseas markets, including the US and China. Last week, the US took a series of harsh measures against Korean exporters. Notably, the Department of Commerce introduced high anti-dumping and countervailing duties on cold-rolled steel plates produced by POSCO and Hyundai Steel. In the US, protectionism has been gaining force. The outcry against free trade has been fanned by politicians in the run-up to the presidential election. The US is not alone in moving away from free trade. This trend has been manifested by the decision of the UK to leave the EU. The rising tide of protectionism poses serious challenges to Korean companies.
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  • Editor’s Picks / 01 May 2016 at 23:02 GMT

    China cops unfair blame in global steel crisis

    South China Morning Post
    Controversy over steel “dumping” is a political gift horse for US and European steelmakers, and it is being worked as noisily as possible. In Europe, debate rages over whether anti-dumping duties should be imposed on China. We should not forget that Europe-wide, significantly more companies and workers benefit from using cheap steel than suffer because of it. The state of the world steel industry is but one illustration of the dreadful harm inflicted on the world economy by the excesses through from 1990 to 2007. The temptation to beat up on China may be hard to resist at present, but we should remember that despite all the sins we want to blame on China, it is China that will play the pivotal part our recovery.
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  • 2y
    Michael O'Neill Michael O'Neill
    It is incredible. In a country of over 330 million people, how can Trump and Clinton be viewed as the best people to lead the nation.?...
    2y
    Martin O'Rourke Martin O'Rourke
    It's the lowest-common-denominator level of the debate in the US that is really depressing. Focusing on the perceived sweatiness of one candidate or the size of someone's...
    2y
    Patto Patto
    Trump will tone done his bluster and move to centre when it comes to a one-on-one with Clinton. Much less off the cuff stuff and more scripted...
  • Editor’s Picks / 20 December 2015 at 23:38 GMT

    Historic WTO deal frees up agricultural exports trade

    The Sydney Morning Herald
    The WTO's 163 members agreed on the weekend, in an historic ministerial meeting in Kenya, to abolish all government subsidies to farmers, saying subsidies have a distortionary effect in global need and they need to be removed. The deal will see the immediate removal of farmer subsidies by developed members, with developing countries to follow by 2018. Export subsidies will now be phased out for agricultural commodities including sugar, beef, pork, lamb, dairy, wheat, rice, wine, fruit, vegetables, processed foods and cotton. The historic breakthrough in global trade talks will see $15 billion worth of agricultural export subsidies abolished around the world. Australia's trade minister hailed the deal as a “major win” for Australian farmers.
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  • Editor’s Picks / 07 October 2015 at 3:13 GMT

    Populists, controversy pose hurdles for Pacific trade deal

    The Conversation
    The mammoth Trans Pacific Partnership should bring big benefits to its 12 trading partner nations – including the US, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Australia and emerging Pacific Rim states. The TPP will eliminate obvious barriers like tariffs as well as sneaky regulatory ones. Its controversial features include its investor-state dispute settlement provision that allows multinationals to bring legal claims against host states. And its obligations concerning regulatory transparency and standardization will necessitate costly reforms for developing countries like Vietnam and Malaysia. Finally presidential candidate Donald Trump promises to renege on the deal if he gets elected. But it's unlikely that any sensible politician will resist the TPP in the longer term.
    Read article on The Conversation
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