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  • Article / 04 December 2017 at 8:00 GMT

    Morning Markets: GBP steady as UK, EU finalise deal

    Head of Editorial Content / Saxo Bank
    Denmark
    Morning Markets: GBP steady as UK, EU finalise deal
    Last week's reports of an imminent Brexit divorce bill deal helped GBP to rally versus its peers, but sterling is holding steady into today's final draft and may have limited upside going forward. Meanwhile, Bitcoin dumped 10% of its value overnight before rallying higher again and currently sits at the $11,430 level.
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  • Editor’s Picks / 06 March 2016 at 21:41 GMT

    Modi's tilt toward farmers may cost him business support

    Nikkei Asian Review
    India's Narendra Modi came to power promising sweeping pro-business reforms. But his government appears to have shifted focus to scoring points with farmers in the latest budget. This could lead to the popular prime minister's downfall unless he plays it carefully. The budget for fiscal 2016 boosts agriculture spending by 84%. Projects include bringing electricity to all villages by May 2018. The government aims to double farmers' incomes within five years, Finance Minister Arun Jaitley said. As 70% of Indians live in villages, increased rural prosperity is essential for growth. But the budget breaks from the government's previous spending plans, which placed weight on developing infrastructure and the business environment in line with the prime minister's pro-business agenda.
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  • Editor’s Picks / 10 January 2016 at 21:27 GMT

    Modi makes gains in taming India's entrenched elites

    Nikkei Asian Review
    India's Narendra Modi came to power on a promise to build a new India. There is one area where his government is making progress: taming India's entrenched elite. India has long been dominated by a tiny elite: a couple of hundred extended families. In India, dynastic elites control the top echelons in every sphere of public life. Many have roots that stretch back to the colonial era. Ties of patronage and marriage have fused them into a discernable class with a strong sense of entitlement, who react to even minor challenges by closing ranks. The elite can be remarkably resilient. History – from post-revolutionary France to modern Thailand – has shown that it is a mistake to write off the old establishment.
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  • Editor’s Picks / 10 January 2016 at 21:02 GMT

    Wild market swings, inequality pose a test for Beijing

    Business Spectator
    The gyrations in China’s stockmarket will test Beijing's ability to manage a capitalist-style economic crisis and a public unused to turmoil of this sort. Crises of capitalism are not supposed to happen in the People’s Republic, after all. Not only are some of China’s key institutions either looking rather wobbly, underperforming, or burdened with debt, but there are growing levels of inequality between China’s growing capitalist class — or connected to those that are — and the rest. Inequality induces outrage among China’s masses. Try as they might, it has proved difficult for Beijing to silence an increasingly vociferous online community from drawing attention to corruption and the gulf between insiders and outsiders.
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  • Editor’s Picks / 10 December 2015 at 4:33 GMT

    High grade coal offers India low emissions benefits: minister

    The Sydney Morning Herald
    Supplying Australian coal to India will result in lower carbon emissions than if the sub-continent turned to alternate sources of supply such as Indonesia, says Australian Environment Minister Greg Hunt has said. “It is their choice, not ours,” Hunt said of India's desire to source rising volumes of coal from Australia. “As a developing country, they are saying 'we want to bring people out of poverty, but if we have higher efficiency fuels that can allow us to go to super-critical or ultra-super critical [coal-fired power station] production which in net terms means we will have lower emissions than if we go to Indonesia with high sulphur, low efficiency fuels',” Hunt said.
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  • Editor’s Picks / 08 December 2015 at 0:59 GMT

    Paris climate change talks raise meaty issues

    The Global Times
    As world attention focuses on the Paris climate talks, debate about measures to curb global warming are heating up. Diet is one area for debate. A study of British eating habits showed that meat lovers' diets cause double the climate-warming emissions of vegetarian diets. Avoiding excessive meat consumption, especially beef, is good for the environment. Eating less meat reduces cancer risk, aids weight loss and helps lower cholesterol levels. It also helps reduce wealth disparities, as meat not consumed by the obese can be fed to the hungry. A low meat diet saves money and makes you eco-friendly at the same time. So, it's high time for people of rich nations, especially the obese, to lose weight to make both the climate and themselves healthier.
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  • Editor’s Picks / 11 November 2015 at 3:48 GMT

    Jakarta can reap demographic windfall, beat extremism

    The Jakarta Globe
    Indonesia's population will be over 300 million by 2030 and more than 65% of Indonesians will be of working age by then. Government will determine whether Indonesia can make the most of this competitive advantage. Take a look at the Middle East. The roots of discontent in that region lie in poverty, corruption and unequal opportunity. Terrorist organizations recruit people in their productive age with nothing to lose, who are easily manipulated. This is not to say that the Islamic State is at Indonesia's doorstep, but steps must be taken to ensure that youths never lose faith in their own future. And it is never too soon for Jakarta to start working on that.
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  • Editor’s Picks / 03 November 2015 at 22:10 GMT

    Beijing's five-year plan .... pensions, electric bikes and much more

    South China Morning Post
    Beijing has released the detail of its social and economic policies for the next five years, following a meeting last week of senior Communist Party members to discuss the plan. It covers everything from financial reform to pensions and electric bicycles. The proposals include yuan convertibility, yuan membership of the IMF’s basket of reserve currencies, cleaning up the internet and modernisation of the armed forces. Other goals include taking steps to reduce poverty in the countryside, the setting up of a strict water resource management system, logging bans in natural forests, and encouraging universities to be pragmatic and career-oriented. And Beijing plans to roll out medical insurance for urban and rural households.
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  • Editor’s Picks / 17 June 2015 at 1:32 GMT

    Australia dodges middle class squeeze, for now

    Business Spectator
    Three studies into wealth distribution landed this week, all painting a picture of a world in which the divide between the haves and have-nots is widening. Thankfully, the IMF has found that Australia, Canada and Sweden are important exceptions to a middle-class squeeze that has hit many advanced economies. But lest we get complacent in Australia, separate research reveals a yawning chasm in household savings that far outstrips disparity in incomes. Indeed Australia’s grip on its claim of a fair go is increasingly tenuous. And predictions of an extreme gap between rich and poor signal unprecedented social problems ahead.
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  • Editor’s Picks / 30 April 2015 at 7:19 GMT

    Time to shrink the pay gap, says outgoing CEO

    The Sydney Morning Herald
    Telstra outgoing chief executive David Thodey admits his high salary is indefensible when compared to other employees, and called on companies to shrink the gulf between their top executives and low-paid staff. Thodey was frank about his high wages. He has earned over $27 million in cash and vested shares in the three years to July 2014 – $12.84 million in the 2104 financial year alone. But unlike some CEOs, Thodey is not a flashy spender. He still drives a Toyota Corolla. Thodey brought Telstra back from the brink of failure to its highest share price in 14 years.
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