All
  • All
  • Articles
  • Squawks
  • Trade views
  • Must reads
  • Videos
  • Calendar
Views
Write a Squawk
No posts
  • 1y
    Georgio Stoev Georgio Stoev
    Great article Gary!
  • 1y
    Market Predator Market Predator
    @Peter: last week I had serious issue with my Computer. (complete blow off of motherboard) so I followed TF on my smart mobile :)) Over the weekend...
  • Article / 19 July 2017 at 9:04 GMT

    History tells investors not to short China — #SaxoStrats

    Head of Equity Strategy / Saxo Bank
    Denmark
    History tells investors not to short China — #SaxoStrats
    The media in the developed world are obsessed with China's growth and often highlight it as unnatural and unsustainable. But that thinking is wrong because it is not based on historical facts about urbanisation in the US and Europe. By establishing the right baseline we show that China's construction spending is no mystery, but a natural development of rapid urbanisation.
    Read the article
    1y
    Peter Garnry Peter Garnry
    Thanks. Good question. China has an estimated total population of 1.384 billion in 2017. With the recent changes to birth rate and expected increase in life expectancy...
    1y
    Vatsid Vatsid
    I read this article and come away with more conviction on the US in the longer term:). Great article!! Would love to see a view point on...
    1y
    CharlieSMS CharlieSMS
    yes ,indeed ,tks
  • Article / 26 June 2017 at 12:23 GMT

    Why active investing is coming back

    Head of Equity Strategy / Saxo Bank
    Denmark
    Why active investing is coming back
    Active investing will make a comeback before the inefficiencies from rising passive investing are big enough to pay for the high-margin business of active investing. The main driver will be low realised returns of around 4% over the next decade on popular asset allocation strategies built on ETFs.
    Read the article
  • Article / 05 January 2017 at 11:31 GMT

    Commodity funds and the annual rebalance — #SaxoStrats

    Head of Commodity Strategy / Saxo Bank
    Denmark
    Commodity funds and the annual rebalance — #SaxoStrats
    Commodities had a strong revival last year following five years of losses. With the outlook for 2017 continuing to show signs of improvement, we highlight two of the major commodity index funds which are accessible through exchange-traded funds and look at what next week's annual rebalancing means for you.
    Read the article
  • 2y
    Teis Knuthsen Teis Knuthsen
    Hi, that's certainly possible, but we probably won't do it online. You are welcome to contact me at tk@saxobank.com, or get in touch through your normal Saxo...
    2y
    PatouDesuite PatouDesuite
    Hi
    I forgot the ETF Tools, or how to be consistantly inform of the change in allocation.
    Thanks
    1y
    Jgl51 Jgl51
    You should also show, in addition to returns, maximum loss and number of months needed to recover. Thanks for sharing this ETF portfolio
  • 2y
    QuikStrike QuikStrike
    Thanks to Georgio for allowing us at QuikStrike to be part of the WOW series! We look forward to providing more information to the Saxo TradingFloor community.

    Please...
    2y
    Georgio Stoev Georgio Stoev
    Thank you Nick for sharing such easy to use, invaluable market information on the Tradingfloor.
    1y
    Robert87 Robert87
    This comment has been redacted
  • Editor’s Picks / 23 May 2016 at 14:00 GMT

    Big returns don't come easy for fund investors

    Bloomberg
    In the hunt to beat hedge funds, big returns don't come easy, says Bloomberg Gadfly columnist Lisa Abramowicz. "If investors want to win big in the current market, they need to be prepared to do a lot of work. Otherwise, they might as well just go to Las Vegas and try their luck at the tables," Abramowicz says. Good returns this year have come at debt-focused closed-end funds, which have shares that trade daily, pay dividends and use leverage to buy fixed-income securities, she says. Those funds delivered returns of about 9.5% on average in less than three months. "That's remarkable in an ultra-low yield world, especially when macroeconomic strategies have been hammered by unpredictable market swings." The reason closed-end funds have gained so much is that they are also "a hotbed of activism from the funds' shareholders," Abramowicz says. Such funds spotlight the fact that big returns don't come easy at this point, but require diligence, effort and sometimes intervention, she says.
    Read article on Bloomberg
    Go to post