All
  • All
  • Articles
  • Squawks
  • Trade views
  • Must reads
  • Videos
  • Calendar
Views
Write a Squawk
No posts
  • 2y
    AndrejLences AndrejLences
    Thank you for the article. Reuters reported : Below are finance ministry calculations on how the budget rule could affect the rouble exchange rate. ...
    2y
    AndrejLences AndrejLences
    Again. Here are the calculation https://s24.postimg.org/6vl8r85jn/2017_02_02.png , in previous message everything I have copied got stuck together so its unreadable... If oil is going to be at...
    2y
    Nadia Kazakova Nadia Kazakova
    Hi, I think devaluation will be very gradual, probably at around 1% or 0.6RUB/USD or so a month with the Urals oil price at around $55. So...
  • 3y
    Nidum Nidum
    I think there is no way the elite/establishment will let him in even if he did win popular vote by a landslide, the corruption is so huge,...
    3y
    Travis Travis
    This comment has been redacted
  • 3y
    Tepord Tepord
    Не помогло...
    3y
    Tepord Tepord
    Now, the government needs money again. Even if it sells almost a fifth of Rosneft, though -- worth about $11 billion today -- Moscow would still be...
  • Editor’s Picks / 13 June 2016 at 0:39 GMT

    China's ties with Africa may outshine much-hyped TPP

    The Global Times
    China is Africa's prime trading partner. Africa-China cooperation may be overlooked, but its future seems more promising, perhaps even more than the much-hyped the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Africa offers massive economic and investment opportunities. If well managed, they could define determine the world's trade and geopolitics. China is already on its way to upping the continent's profile through heavy investment in energy, roads and ports which have in turn transformed Africa's investment climate. Intra-Africa trade is rising, so is Africa's trade with other continents across the world. TPP is no doubt a hot issue today, but China-Africa ties should not be forgotten; there is huge economic potential underneath them.
    Read article on The Global Times
    Go to post
    3y
    David E.H. Smith David E.H. Smith
    PREVENTING MULTI-BILLIONS of DOLLARS of LAWSUITS to be paid by the ‘harmless’ Voters/Taxpayers.

    TPP, TTIP, et al, OPPOSITION REDUCES FEAR; "the (EU) Commission’s fear is a multi-million euro...
  • Editor’s Picks / 23 May 2016 at 1:16 GMT

    US role in Asia can no longer be taken for granted

    The Straits Times
    Much of what motivates Americans to vote for Trump and Sanders stems from domestic issues. At first glance, the bombastic tycoon and the rumpled social activist have little in common, but on foreign policy, both point in the same direction. Both have refused to court foreign policy elites. But more deeply, both clearly offer an image of America as a much less engaged global player. Both reject the Washington foreign policy playbook. Hillary Clinton has a far better chance than either of these men of ending up in the White House. But she will now know, after this year's primaries, that the America she might lead will be much less willing to follow her into foreign adventures.
    Read article on The Straits Times
    Go to post
  • Editor’s Picks / 12 January 2016 at 5:43 GMT

    End to sanctions in sight as Xi plans Iran trip

    Nikkei Asian Review
    With the end to sanctions on Iran in sight, China's president Xi Jinping plans to visit late this month to prepare the way for businesses to follow. Xi hopes to be the first foreign leader travelling to the country after the sanctions are lifted, with potential stops in Saudi Arabia and Egypt as well. Business leaders are expected to accompany him to Iran. Tehran agreed to greatly scale back its nuclear program in exchange for sanctions relief in a deal with the US, the UK, France, Germany, Russia and China. EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini says the restrictions could end soon. Before such steps are taken, the IAEA must first verify that Iran has curbed its nuclear development.
    Read article on Nikkei Asian Review
    Go to post
  • Editor’s Picks / 13 October 2015 at 10:41 GMT

    China's Silk Road — big on vision, light on detail

    Financial Times
    China's Silk Road plan will, if it comes to eventual fruition, be the grandest plan of economic diplomacy since the Marshall Plan flooded Europe's coffers in the aftermath of WW2. But, write Charles Clover and Lucy Hornby, president Xi Jinping's grand vision on which he hopes to secure his legacy lacks detail and leaves those states hoping to benefit from the potentially enormous cash injection required to develop the overall infrastructure, grasping for clues. China will also have to wrestle with being a great economic power and taking on board the security element as its influence grows into central Asia and beyond which has become the biggest foreign policy headache for the US for decades. The Silk Road is alive with possibilities, but even if it is a success, it will force Beijing to confront issues it might have hoped "soft power" would help it avoid.
    Read article on Financial Times
    Go to post
  • Article / 24 March 2015 at 11:00 GMT

    New Asian bank - a battle for western minds...and wallets

    Managing Director / Asia-analytica Research
    China
    New Asian bank - a battle for western minds...and wallets
    China’s move to set up an Asian infrastructure bank is a deeper game than a soft power battle with the US. It is part of a broader strategy of integration with the global financial system. Sharing the political and commercial risks with Western governments of lending to Asian economies will ease some of the pain China has encountered in funding Third World infrastructure projects.
    Read the article
  • Article / 06 August 2014 at 10:42 GMT

    Why BRICS group isn't breaking the Buck

    Managing Partner / Spotlight Group
    United Kingdom
    Why BRICS group isn't breaking the Buck
    The BRICS group does not wish to see global commerce dominated by the US dollar. There may be more activity in emerging currencies but it is still small scale. Ambitious plans indeed, but for now, we live in a world of dollar dominion.
    Read the article