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  • 3d
    Martin O'Rourke Martin O'Rourke
    A dramatic spike for EURUSD indeed after our projection of 1.1000 potentially being on the cards in Morning Markets had initially looked optimistic following a slide towards...
    3d
    Martin O'Rourke Martin O'Rourke
    USDJPY also went into a steep slide after the data print from above 124.30 to hit an intraday low of 123.533. The pair was at 123.569 at...
  • 3d
    Jader Jader
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  • Editor’s Picks / Friday at 3:54 GMT

    Why Italy is most likely to leave the euro

    The Sydney Morning Herald
    Italy has only grown by 4.6% – in total – since it joined the euro. It's hard to say what went wrong with Italy. Nothing ever went right. Unlike Greece, there was never much of a boom there – only a bust. Part of the problem is that Italy, as the IMF points out, has structural problems. It's hard to start a business and hard to fire people, which makes employers wary about hiring. It is a small business dystopia. And part of the problem is the euro itself. It's too expensive for Italian exporters, and too restrictive for the government that's had to cut its budget even more than it otherwise would have.
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    3d
    Jader Jader
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  • Editor’s Picks / Thursday at 16:45 GMT

    Best approach? Ignore the Fed

    BloombergView
    There is only one phrase that matters to markets as far as the US Federal Reserve and its intentions towards the inevitable interest-rate hike are concerned and that's "data-dependent". The rest is all noise and you would do well to take the regular Fed briefings with a pinch of salt, says Barry Ritholtz. The Fed has only two concerns - keeping employment and inflation in check and with both of those under control, "the data remain far stronger than anyone in the midst of the financial crisis would have imagined," he says, and that means normalisation of interest rates before Christmas.
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