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  • Article / 10 February 2017 at 8:00 GMT

    Morning Markets: Trump reinvigorates the reflation trade

    Former managing editor, TradingFloor.com / Saxo Bank
    Denmark
    Morning Markets: Trump reinvigorates the reflation trade
    The great reinflation trade is once again alive and kicking after president Trump pledged a 'phenomenal' plan was in the pipeline for a raft of business tax cuts. Meanwhile, Japan's prime minister Shinzo Abe flies in for bilateral talks set against the backdrop of a weakening yen.
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  • Article / 22 September 2016 at 12:00 GMT

    Saxo on Brexit: When the phoney war is over

    Former managing editor, TradingFloor.com / Saxo Bank
    Denmark
    Saxo on Brexit: When the phoney war is over
    Tomorrow marks three months since Britain voted to leave the European Union. While Brexiteers have questioned what the fuss was all about given the relatively benign state of the UK economy, the reality is that we are in a phoney-war period and the hard road lies ahead.
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    2y
    Martin O'Rourke Martin O'Rourke
    Hi Krunil48. Yes of course you are right on the speculation and I think we really won't have a comprehensive answer on Brexit until the process of...
    2y
    Krunil48 Krunil48
    Hi Martin. Just my opinion, but above this Chinese deal, in the public perception, appears a large question mark, as of a Tom & Gerry cartoon. In...
    2y
    Martin O'Rourke Martin O'Rourke
    GBPUSD has hit a fresh 31-year low after UK PM May's comments this weekend that point to a start of the EU-exit process by March 31 and...
  • Editor’s Picks / 05 July 2016 at 23:25 GMT

    Japan Inc counts the cost of Brexit as yen soars

    The Straits Times
    Japan Inc is counting the cost of Brexit. The yen's surge after Britain's decision to exit the EU has turned the outlook for a gain in annual profit to the first decline in four years. Take Toyota Motor. Since the Brexit vote, the mean forecast for net income at the world's biggest carmaker has slid to $16.5 billion. The referendum outcome triggered the yen's biggest one-day advance in almost 18 years, taking its gains against the dollar this year to 17%. Profit estimates for Nissan and Canon were also cut by analysts after the Brexit vote. Growth concerns in Europe after the referendum and the currency's gains are casting a shadow on exports and threatening to derail Shinzo Abe's efforts to free Asia's second-biggest economy from deflation.
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  • Editor’s Picks / 24 March 2016 at 5:30 GMT

    Japanese industry driven to cooperate on self-driving cars

    Nikkei Asian Review
    Major Japanese automakers and autoparts suppliers will work together on research and development of autonomous driving vehicles to narrow the gap with US and European rivals. An agreement has been reached among companies that have been participating in a study panel set up by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. The group includes six carmakers, including Toyota, Nissan and Honda, as well as major manufacturers of auto electronics such as Denso, Renesas Electronics and Panasonic. They aim to start conducting tests on public roads in 2020.
    Read article on Nikkei Asian Review
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  • 23 June
    Jadira F. Norton Jadira F. Norton
    Good::
  • Editor’s Picks / 11 January 2016 at 6:18 GMT

    Pick-up trucks and SUVs drive car industry sales

    Reuters
    When US President Barack Obama visits Detroit's annual car show on January 20, exactly one year before he leaves office, he is expected to tout how much the industry has changed since he orchestrated a federally funded rescue in 2009. But many of the changes on display at the city's annual auto show will not reflect the green-transport revival the president envisioned. The 'Detroit Three' car makers racked up record sales and profits in the US market last year not because of electric cars or plug-in hybrids, but because of soaring demand for pickup trucks and sport utility vehicles fuelled by petrol prices that hit multi-year lows.
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  • 2y
    peter peter
    Missing RDS on the list. Shell has got best financials in oil industry now (based on saxo stock screener).
  • Editor’s Picks / 10 November 2015 at 6:06 GMT

    Legal questions could put self-driving cars in slow lane

    Nikkei Asian Review
    At the 2015 Tokyo Motor Show, Nissan and Toyota showcased concept cars with autonomous driving technology. But while putting self-driving cars on the road in large numbers is within reach, Atsushi Nakayama writes to make if happen, two obstacles – one technological and one legal – will have to be overcome. In the case of self-driving vehicles, the question of liability looms. Who should be held responsible when accidents occur? About 90% of fatal road accidents are caused by human error. If autonomous cars are designed to drastically reduce or eliminate this source of error, it would, perhaps, be difficult to hold the owner of the car or the passengers responsible for a crash. Instead, the car's manufacturer might be liable.
    Read article on Nikkei Asian Review
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