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  • Article / 19 March 2018 at 12:54 GMT

    Equities to survive macro bombardment and tech tax? – #SaxoStrats

    Head of Equity Strategy / Saxo Bank
    Denmark
    Equities to survive macro bombardment and tech tax? – #SaxoStrats
    Global equities are rolling into the new week on a weak footing following last week's declines. Macro data are getting weaker and this week's macro figures will likely support this trend. The flattening yield curve will be a big talking point, Chinese earnings releases will dominate emerging markets and technology companies will be under pressure from a potential new technology tax proposed by the EU Commission.
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    1y
    Alan M Alan M
    Hey Peter, do you remain positive on facebook from here, or do you feel this is the first of a whole shelf of shoes to drop? I...
    1y
    Peter Garnry Peter Garnry
    I can't comment specifically on the direction of Facebook. But as we highlighted in today's morning call (see link) Facebook's stock sits on the 200-day MA and...
  • Editor’s Picks / 19 August 2016 at 4:39 GMT

    Analyst sees opportunities in despised China market

    CNBC
    Foreigners may be avoiding China's stock market in droves, but it has offered up interesting opportunities, said Mark Matthews, head of research for Asia at Julius Baer. China's markets have stumbled since the start of the year, with the Shanghai composite down nearly 13% so far this year, even as US stock indices have been tapping record highs. "It is the most despised market in the world. Foreigners have never been more underweight China than they are now," Matthews told CNBC's "Squawk Box" on Friday. But there were many reasons to start targeting the market, he said.
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  • Editor’s Picks / 31 December 2014 at 5:11 GMT

    China's banks wary of online rivals

    South China Morning Post
    The rise of non-bank finance is a worrying trend for China's mainstream banks. Mainstream financial institutions now face a new sort of rival – technology giants pushing into the financial sector. China's banking regulator recently announced that it had given Tencent permission to open the nation's first "intenet bank" – Shenzhen Qianhai Weizhong Bank, or WeBank for short. WeBank is just the first of five pilot commercial lenders to gain official clearance to start operating. The battle for market share is likely to fought out in the big data arena, as traditional and start-up lending rivals seek ways to turn their understanding of client needs into commercial advantage. Several banks have already picked up tricks from technology companies with the intention of beating them at their own game. For example, Ping An Bank and China Merchants Bank have both set up P2P platforms designed to recapture business snatched by technology companies.
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